Publications

 

2018

19. Banks, PB, Carthey, AJR, and Bytheway, JP (Accepted) Australian native mammals recognize and respond to alien predators: a meta-analysis. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.

18. Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2018) Naive, bold, or just hungry? An invasive exotic prey species recognises but does not respond to its predators. Biological Invasions. In press.

17. Carthey, AJR, Tims, AR, Geedicke, I, and Leishman, MR (2018) Broadscale patterns in smoke‐responsive germination from the south‐eastern Australian flora. Journal of Vegetation Science, In press.

16. Carthey, AJR, and Blumstein, DT (2018) Predicting predator recognition in a changing world. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 33(2): 106-155

 

2017

15. Carthey, AJR, Bucknall, MP, Wierucka, K and Banks, PB. (2017), Novel predators emit novel cues: a mechanism for prey naivety towards alien predators. Scientific Reports, 7(1): 16377

 

2016

14. Frank, ASK, Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB (2016) Does historical coexistence with dingoes explain current avoidance of domestic dogs? Island bandicoots are naive to dogs, unlike their mainland counterparts. PLoS One 11(9): e0161447

13. Carthey, AJR and Leishman, MR. (2016), How do germination responses to smoke relate to phylogeny, growth form, fire response strategies and vegetation type? A focus on eastern Australia. Australian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation, 25(2): 3-4

12. Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2016) Naivete is not forever: responses of a vulnerable native rodent to its long term alien predators. Oikos 125(7): 918-926. DOI: 10.1111/oik.02723

11. Carthey, AJR, Fryirs, KA, Ralph, T J, Bu, H and Leishman, MR (2016), How seed traits predict floating times: a biophysical process model for hydrochorous seed transport behaviour in fluvial systems. Freshwater Biology, 61: 19–31. DOI:10.1111/fwb.12672

 

2015

10. Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2015) Foraging in groups affects giving-up densities: solo foragers quit sooner. Oecologia 178(3): 707-713. DOI: 10.1007/s00442-015-3274-x

9. Tortosa, FS, Barrio, IC, Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB (2015) No longer naive? Generalised responses of rabbits to marsupial predators in Australia. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 69(10): 1649-1655

8. Moseby, KE, Carthey, AJR, and Schroeder, T. (2015) The influence of predation and prey naivety on reintroduction success: current and future directions. In: (Armstrong, DP, ed.) Advances in Reintroduction Biology for Australian and New Zealand Fauna. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, VIC

 

2014

7. Banks, PB, Carthey, AJR, Bytheway, JP, Hughes, NK, and Price, CJ (2014) Olfaction and predator-prey interactions amongst mammals in Australia. In: (Glen, A.S. and Dickman, C.R., eds) Carnivores of Australia. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood VIC. http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/6708.htm

6. Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB (2014) Naïveté in novel ecological interactions: lessons from theory and experimental evidence. Biological Reviews 89(4): 932-949. DOI: 10.1111/brv.12087

5. Heavener, SJ, Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB. (2014) Competitive naïveté between a highly successful invader and a functionally similar native species. Oecologia 175(1): 73-84.

 

2013

4. Bedoya-Perez, M., Carthey, AJR, Mella, V, MacArthur, C, and Banks, PB (2013) A practical guide to avoid giving up on giving-up densities. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 67(10):1541-1553. DOI: 10.1007/s00265-013-1609-3

3. Bytheway, JP, Carthey, AJR, Banks, PB (2013) Risk vs. reward: How predators and prey respond to aging olfactory cues. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 67(5): 715-725.

 

2012

2. Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB (2012) When does an alien become a native species? A vulnerable native mammal recognizes and responds to its long-term alien predator. PLoS One 7(2): e31804. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0031804.

 

2011

1. Carthey, AJR, Bytheway, JP, and Banks, PB (2011) Negotiating a noisy, information-rich environment in search of cryptic prey: olfactory predators need patchiness in prey cues. Journal of Animal Ecology 80: 742-752.

 

Refereed conference papers published in full

Fryirs, K, O’Donnell J, Carthey, AJR, and Leishman, MR (2014) Is passive revegetation through utilisation of soil seed banks a viable rehabilitation option in riparian ecosystems? In: Vietz, G., Rutherfurd, I.D., and Hughes, R. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Australian Stream Management Conference: Catchment to Coast, 27 to 30 July 2014, Townsville, Queensland, published by River Basin Management Society, pp. 268-273. http://rbms.com.au/event/asm/7asm/

 

Conference presentations and invited seminars

Carthey, AJR, Manea, AM, and Leishman, MR. (2017) The smell of invasion success: a comparison of Australian native and exotic plant volatile organic chemicals under ambient and elevated CO2 wsr. EcoTas 2017: the joint conference of the Ecological Society of Australia and the New Zealand Ecological Society, Hunter Valley, November 2017

Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB. (2017) Behavioural and chemical ecology approaches to novel species interactions: what do we know about naïveté in the Australian mammal fauna? 12th International Mammalogical Conference, Perth, July 2017

Carthey, AJR (2016) The smell of success: behavioural and chemical approaches to understanding invasions. The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, The University of California, Los Angeles, March 2016.

Carthey, AJR (2015) Behavioural and chemical approaches to novel species interactions. Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, May 2015.

Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB. (2013) Naiveté, novelty and native fauna: mismatched ecological interactions in the Australian environment. Australasian Wildlife Management Conference, Palmerston North, New Zealand, November 2013

Banks, PB, Bytheway, JB, and Carthey, AJR (2013) Negotiating novel landscapes of fear. 11th International Mammalogical Conference, Belfast, August 2013

Carthey, AJR, and Banks, PB (2013) What can odour chemistry and prey behaviour tell us about naiveté in Australian mammalian predator-prey interactions? Invasive Mammals Symposium, Australian Mammal Society 59th Scientific Meeting, University of New South Wales, Sydney, July 2013

Banks, PB, Hughes, N, Price, C, Carthey, AJR, Daly, A and Bytheway, J (2013) Complex interactions in the ecology of olfactory communication. In: In search of super-lures: mammalian communication and pest control (Ed. by W. Linklater). Cliftons – Level 28, The Majestic Centre, 100 Willis St, Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington

Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2012) Using cameras and chemistry to understand naiveté in Australian mammalian predator-prey interactions; results from a three year study. Australian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Adelaide, Australia, November 2012

Banks, PB, Carthey, AJR, Bytheway, JP, and Price CJ (2012) New directions in ecologically based pest management: Using behavioral ecology to reduce black rat impacts. South Australian Museum, Adelaide, Australia

Banks, PB, and Carthey, AJR (2012) Understanding naiveté to solve the nativeness dilemma. Australian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Adelaide, Australia, November 2012

Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2012) Remote sensing cameras reveal subtle behavioural responses of free-living small mammals to predator odour. Australian Wildlife Management Society and Royal Zoological Society of NSW Camera Trapping Colloquium in Wildlife Management and Research, Sydney, Australia, October 2012

Bedoya-Perez, M, Mella, V, Carthey, AJR, MacArthur, C, and Banks, PB (2012) Giving up on GUDs? International Society for Behavioural Ecology Congress, Lund, Sweden, August 2012

Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2012) When does an alien become a native species? A native marsupial responds to its long term alien predator. International Society for Behavioural Ecology Congress, Lund, Sweden, August 2012

Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB (2010) Is a vulnerable native marsupial naive to the predation threat of domestic cats and dogs? Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Canberra, December 2010

Carthey, AJR, Bytheway, JP, and Banks, PB (2009) Spatial gradients in prey cues and the foraging success of a model olfactory predator, 10th International Mammalogical Congress, Mendoza, Argentina

Banks, PB, Price, C, Carthey, AJR, and Bytheway, JP (2009) Protecting prey with chemical camouflage. Australian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Napier, New Zealand, December 2009

Carthey, AJR, Bytheway, JP, and Banks, PB (2008) Multiple foraging strategies in the search for cryptic prey, Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Sydney, December 2008

 

Scholarly news articles:

Carthey, AJR and Banks, PB. (23rd Feb 2012) Ask the locals: a new way to tell if dingoes are native. The Conversation. http://theconversation.com/ask-the-locals-a-new-way-to-tell-if-dingoes-are-native-5433#. Accessed 29/05/2013.

 

Professional Reports:

Claus, S, Imgraben, S, Brennan, K, Carthey, AJR, Daly, B and Saintilan, N (2011) NSW Wetlands Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting Program Technical Report. State of NSW and Office of Environment and Heritage, Sydney

Ralph, TJ and Carthey, AJR (2008) Assessment of impacts of in-channel and floodplain structures in the Macquarie Marshes. Macquarie Marshes Compliance Operation, 11th – 16th July 2008, Final Report, November 2008. Rivers and Wetlands Unit, NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change, Sydney

Philip, N, Claus, S, Delgado, E and Carthey, AJR (2007) Sydney Drinking Water Catchment Audit Report 2007. NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change, Sydney

 

Theses

Carthey AJR (2013) Naiveté, novelty and native status: Mismatched ecological interactions in the Australian environment. PhD Thesis. School of Biological Sciences, USYD (submitted Nov 2012, accepted May 2013).

Carthey AJR (2007) Spatial gradients in prey cues and the foraging success of an olfactory predator. BSc (Hons) Thesis. School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW, Sydney.

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